Ah yes... the all-familiar red pen that Malaysian teachers use to mark your papers. Sure, there are teachers who use pens of other colours (you get what I mean, right?) but it is often the red pen the quintessential tool for marking students' homework and grading their papers. I, for one, used to see a lot of red all over my Malay exercise books, worksheets and examination papers... and honestly, they didn't always mean good news!

BUT isn't the Year 6 Malay listening and speaking module different? How do teachers put your listening and speaking into marks on paper? It's time to explore the module's marking scheme!

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Assessment in Malaysian education system

Having assessments, or evaluations, is considered an integral part of the learning and teaching process for a primary school in Malaysia. As the system uses assessments to obtain student information and ascertain whether learning objectives have been achieved, the Malaysian education system mandates that assessments in Year 6 Malay listening and speaking should be carried out continuously over the academic year. This allows teachers to aid students who find certain areas in listening and speaking Malay challenging as well as enrich students' proficiency in other areas. Perhaps you can also read our list of important topics in Year 6 Malay listening and speaking.

The main component for assessment in the Year 6 Malay listening and speaking module is known as Pentaksiran Sekolah, which literally means "School Assessment". It seeks to strengthen student learning, improve teaching, and provide valid information about what has been carried out or achieved in the teaching and learning process. The Year 6 Malay listening and speaking school assessment is carried out in two ways: formative assessment, which is conducted in conjunction with day-to-day classroom activities, and summative assessment for the end of the academic semester or year. You should also read a complete guide on this listening and speaking module.

The formative and summative assessments follow these two main standards:

  • Standard Reference Assessments: What the system calls Pentaksiran Rujukan Standard, the Year 6 Malay school assessment introduces performance standards (as seen below) that provide an overview of students' progress, learning growth and performance. These assessments are a process of obtaining information about how well a student knows, understands, is able to do or has already mastered, which are based on set standards.
  • Performance Standards: Standard Prestasi, as noted in Malay, are like developmental stages - these standards indicate the level of student learning in stages, which can directly demonstrate the degree of students' mastery in the Malay language. These developmental stages are reflected in terms of mastery levels (more on this later) that explain the standards as learning outcomes.
Malaysian education system
For the Malay listening and speaking module, Year 6 students are assessed via daily classroom activities as well as the end of the semester, or year, examinations. Source: cilisos.my

How do students learn Malay in the module?

Before we move onto the specific marking scheme for the Year 6 Malay listening and speaking module, it is important to know what exactly students are being assessed on. In this module, students will learn and be evaluated in three main categories, which will reveal how well students provide responses, their level of communication towards others, and their ability to provide recounts or explain stories. Let's go through these three categories in more detail, shall we?

  • Please Respond: One goal in the Year 6 Malay listening and speaking module is to learn how to correctly produce responses by paying attention to sentences and sentence phrases that are being spoken to them. To produce accurate responses as they learn Malay, students learn by first picking up and identifying language sounds. This then teaches students how to pronounce Malay words the right way, so that they can move on to creating proper sentence structures. With these skills, students will learn how to produce responses in various situations, such as when listening to commands or asking questions.
  • Communication is key: Another basic for listening and speaking Malay is knowing how to communicate - but what does this entail? In this category, Year 6 students are encouraged to communicate in Malay for the purpose of stating requests, to derive and deliver information, and to express opinions. Therefore, students are taught how to use the Malay language in formal and informal situations, and which pronouns and honorifics are appropriate for use in those situations. Students will also learn to make requests or ask for help using the appropriate Malay language, and this knowledge will in turn help them obtain and present information. Concurrently, students are motivated to think critically and creatively, which encourages discussion and opinion-sharing.
  • Storytime: Finally, Year 6 students are taught the proper skills for telling stories - which, really, are not necessarily the fairytale kind. In fact, students are exposed to flowery language, as well as proper intonation and pronunciation - this adds flavour, flair and some excitement to learning Malay, aside from just focusing on Year 6 Malay worksheets. This teaches students to tell "stories" or recounts about past events by making use of various sentences, while still expressing the information accurately and correctly. Think of it as telling your parents about your day at school: if you had to express it in Malay, wouldn't you like to know some flowery phrases or sentences to make your story interesting?

Would you like to know further about Year 6 Malay listening and speaking?

Primary school in Malaysia
In the Malay subject, Year 6 students are taught to demonstrate appropriate responses, use proper communication techniques and be creative when telling stories. Source: says.com

Do teachers follow the primary school Malay syllabus?

So, how do teachers mark your Malay listening and speaking? There are essentially 6 mastery levels for Year 6 students to achieve in their Malay listening and speaking, which are also known as tahap penguasaan in the primary school Malay syllabus. A Malay language teacher, therefore, uses these mastery levels to determine and grade a student's performance in his or her Malay listening and speaking. Let's take a look at what these mastery levels mean for a Year 6 student who is studying the Malay listening and speaking module.

  • Mastery Level 1 - Very Limited: The student demonstrates the ability to listen, understand, respond and deliver information in a variety of situations, however, these abilities are at a very limited level.
  • Level 2- Just Limited: A little better now, but the student still displays a limited ability to listen, understand, respond and provide information if he or she were placed in distinct situations.
  • You have reached Level 3 - Satisfactory: Guess what? The student can now use Malay appropriately, and is better at listening, understanding, responding, and presenting the information.
  • You are improving to a 4 - Good: The student shows a strong command of the language, meaning he or she is able to listen, understand, make responses and present information very well, even if the student has to be put in different situations.
  • You're getting better, Level 5 - Very Good: So close to reaching Excellent, but hey, the student is one who can very well demonstrate skills in listening and speaking Malay - of course, in a detailed manner.
  • Hurray! You achieved a 6 - Excellent: The final developmental stage has now been unlocked! The student can successfully apply skills in listening, understanding, making responses, and conveying information across numerous situations, which the standard considers to be done in a very detailed manner, is consistent, AND the student can be considered a role model (who knew you could walk a runway at a young age, huh?).

Are you interested to look for resources on learning Year 6 Malay listening and speaking?

Learn Malay online
There are six mastery levels to listening and speaking Malay - this could be a challenge! Why not build your skills with a Superprof Malay tutor online? Source: weforum.org

What can I do to learn Malay online course?

Learning to pick up and be fluent in Malay speech and communication can be difficult, especially since schools have never got to open for more than half a year due to COVID-19. It remains sound that people can only pick up and speak a language properly with frequent and consistent practice. The only way Year 6 students can improve in their Malay listening and speaking is if they interact with others in Malay - how can that be done effectively if students are stuck at home?

We at Superprof believe that a fantastic way for you to enhance your Malay listening and speaking skills is if you choose to learn Malay online - and Superprof so happens to provide you with just that! Take your Malay listening and speaking skills out of the classroom (or these days, out of home) and expand your horizons with a Malay tutor - who can guarantee your progress and improvement in learning the language.

Did you know that the average price of a Malay tutor on Superprof sits at only RM38? And that's with quality learning ensured - isn't that crazy? You can ensure that you gain access to quality Malay language learning by heading over to the Superprof website for private tutors, and scroll through our list of Malay tutors who are eagerly waiting for you to book a class with them!

Want to learn in a group instead of tackling Malay on your own? Don't sweat it - the tutoring descriptions under our Malay tutors will tell you the type of tutoring services that are being offered. You can choose to take a group class or go one-on-one, select a preferred time for class, or even shoot a DM to any Malay tutor if you are looking to try a class (you can even take the first class for free!). All you have to do is sign up with Superprof!

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Ayleah